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Thread: Landscape lighting; 4A or 4R?

  1. #1
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    Question Landscape lighting; 4A or 4R?

    Client is adding landscape lighting to his home. The landscape architect is going to install just the transformer, no timer(s), input to the transformer is 120v so it just needs on/off. I have an open output on both a 4A and a 4R RPM. What would be the optimal RPM to connect the landscape transformer? I'm guessing the 4R but wanted to see if anyone had a more informed opinion.

    thanks

  2. #2
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    anyone have an opinion on this? Folks from Lutron, thoughts?

    thanks

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkvossen View Post
    Client is adding landscape lighting to his home. The landscape architect is going to install just the transformer, no timer(s), input to the transformer is 120v so it just needs on/off. I have an open output on both a 4A and a 4R RPM. What would be the optimal RPM to connect the landscape transformer? I'm guessing the 4R but wanted to see if anyone had a more informed opinion.

    thanks
    jkvossen,

    If you are just switching then using a 4R might be the better option. If you bring a dedicated feed to that output then you have the capability of switching 16A of load. If the load is a larger lighting load this might help as the 4A can only handle 10A max per output. You could then save the 4A output in case the client needs to add another dimmed load.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin P. View Post
    jkvossen,

    If you are just switching then using a 4R might be the better option. If you bring a dedicated feed to that output then you have the capability of switching 16A of load. If the load is a larger lighting load this might help as the 4A can only handle 10A max per output. You could then save the 4A output in case the client needs to add another dimmed load.
    thanks Kevin....that is pretty much what I was thinking...thanks for the confirmation!

  5. #5
    First I would find out if the lights/lamps are dim able and if so wait until they're installed to see if they would benefit from dimming. If they do benefit from dimming then I would use the 4a if not then the 4r. Of course I would prefer a wired or wireless dimmer or switch with a power booster (if needed) to my exterior lights so they are electrically isolated from from the lighting system so that lightning strikes won't have a direct path to my lighting system.

    Last edited by vining; 07-17-2014 at 07:07 AM. Reason: Doubled post? Wtf
    VAV
    Danbury, CT

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by vining View Post
    First I would find out if the lights/lamps are dim able and if so wait until they're installed to see if they would benefit from dimming. If they do benefit from dimming then I would use the 4a if not then the 4r. Of course I would prefer a wired or wireless dimmer or switch with a power booster (if needed) to my exterior lights so they are electrically isolated from from the lighting system so that lightning strikes won't have a direct path to my lighting system.

    Or you could use a surge protector

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